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EyeSmart Campaign Articles

The following articles are reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Ophthalmology's EyeSmart campaign.

 

Early Detection Critical to Treating Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a major cause of vision loss worldwide. It affects more than 3 million people in the United States—nearly half of whom are unaware they have the disease. During Glaucoma Awareness Month in January, the Wisconsin Academy of Ophthalmology joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in reminding the public that early detection and treatment can help protect your sight.

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Five Tips to Avoid Toy-Related Eye Injuries 

With the holiday shopping season now in full swing, WAO joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in reminding the public of certain safety guidelines when choosing the perfect gifts for little ones in their lives. A number of recent studies have shown that some popular toy types are commonly associated with childhood eye injuries. These include air guns and other toys that shoot projectiles, high-powered lasers, and sports equipment.

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Sixty Percent of Americans with Diabetes Skip Annual Sight-Saving Exams

People with diabetes are at increased risk of developing serious eye diseases, yet most do not have sight-saving, annual eye exams, according to a large study. This is especially timely as the Wisconsin Academy of Ophthalmology joins the Academy in reiterating the importance of eye exams during the month of November, which is observed as Diabetic Eye Disease Awareness Month.

 

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Ophthalmologists Warn of Five Frightening Risks of Wearing Contact Lenses Without a Prescription

Zombie or devil contact lenses may elevate a Halloween costume’s fright factor, but wearing them without a prescription could result in something far more terrifying – blindness. The Wisconsin Academy of Ophthalmology joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in urging Halloween shoppers to understand the risks of wearing over-the-counter contact lenses. 

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Four Tips to Make Sure Kids’ Eyes and Vision Are ‘Grade A’ This School Year

Shares Back-to-School Tips for Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

With back-to-school time around the corner, parents will be scrambling to buy new school supplies and clothes. As they tick off their long list of school to-dos, ophthalmologists are reminding moms and dads not to neglect one of the most important learning tools: their children’s eyes.

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No Fireworks Are Safe, Even the Innocent Sparkler Causes Thousands of Eye Injuries

Fireworks injuries cause approximately 10,000 visits to the emergency department each year, most of them involve children who suffer thousands of eye injuries.1 Though the most disabling injuries occur with illegal firecrackers, most injuries are caused by legal fireworks parents buy for their children, such as sparklers, firecrackers, bottle rockets, and Roman candles.

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Taking Flomax May Cause Cataract Complications

A new study confirms the link between patients taking Flomax and complications when undergoing cataract surgery.  Men taking Flomax to treat an enlarged prostate face more than double the risk for serious complications should they end cataract surgery.  In this new study, 7.5 percent of the men who had taken Flomax in the two weeks before cataract surgery had a serious complication, compared with 2.7 percent of those who had not taken the drug.  That makes it a 2.3 times greater risk.  This study strengthens an existing study from 2005 about risks associated with taking Flomax before cataract surgery.  The 2005 study found that men taking Flomax or other alpha-blockers before cataract surgery had complications during and immediately after the procedure.

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Patients Won't Lose Sleep Over Blue-light-blocking Lens Implants

A new Australian study looked at whether blue-light-blocking intraocular lenses (IOLs) would disrupt sleep patterns in patients who had this type of lens implanted after cataract removal. 

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Eating Healthy Prevents Age-related Macular Degeneration

A new study confirms the importance of eating healthy to help protect our eyes from age-related macular degeneration (AMD).  Researchers found that people whose diets had higher levels of certain nutrients - vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA - and had high levels of low-glycemic index (low GI) foods, were less likely to develop early and advanced AMD.  Although the researchers say clinical studies are needed before physicians can begin recommending specific nutrient doses or dietary patterns to AMD patients, there's no need for people to delay adding health food to their shopping carts.  Sources of AMD-protective nutrient include citrus fruits, vegetable oils, nuts, whole grains, dark green leafy vegetables and cold water fish.  The GI value is based on how fast a food carbohydrates raise the body's blood sugar levels; low GI foods have less impact on blood sugar fluctuations.

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Summer Safety for Children

Spring is upon us and summer is right around the corner, which means children spend more time outdoors - trips to the beach, outside sporting leagues and playing in the yard.  Research shows that children's eyes can be damaged from sun exposure, just like their skin.  This damage may put them at increased risk of developing debilitating eye diseases such as cataracts or macular degeneration as adults.  It is important to make sure your children are wearing 100 percent UV blocking sunglasses.  Whenever you are outside with children, remember to put a hat and/or sunglasses on them just as you would yourself.  Children should be taught at a young age to wear sunglasses and hats to protect their eyes from the sun, so they will grow up with healthy sun protection habits.  Keep children out of the sun between peak times - 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. - when the sun's UV rays are the strongest.

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